Change is coming

It’s nearly six months to the day since I announced my departure from full-time employment, and while I didn’t quite plan for this, it’s a serendipitous turn of events all the same.

I should lead with the headline: Yes, I just unfollowed everyone on Twitter. If my following you was important, I’m sorry for the disappointment but I need to do this for my mental well-being. My mentions and DMs are open and I’d be happy to chat.

Now on to the main event:

When I resigned in April, what I was really beginning was a journey of self discovery. Over the last few months there have been many, many changes for me – most of them good! In my April post I mentioned that:

In future, I might write more openly about the life I came from, the demons I’ve wrestled with over the years, and the moments of breakthrough that have set me free.

And here we are right now, in the future, and I’m holding up my end of the bargain with past-Wogan. This is going to mean a few changes for me.

The way I blog is changing. For about ten years, there was a lot of stuff I was frankly terrified to say. Some poor decisions early in my career (and a tenuous situation at work) meant I self-censored a lot of the things I would otherwise have posted. What little I did write here was filtered, sanitised, and effectively produced with a formal tone and at arms length. Most of my posts could be copied straight into a corporate email and nobody would raise an eyebrow.

I’m not upset about any of that – if anything, I’m grateful. There’s a lot of dumb shit I absolutely could have said, that would have gotten me in far more trouble. With observation came experience, and this time around I’m a lot more sure of where things stand.

Most of the trouble comes from my interest in politics. Actually it’s my interest in most things related to the construction and maintenance of civilised life – from languages, to infrastructure, to the cultural climate within which we relate to eachother. Figuring all these things out (and trying to explain them) is my absolute favourite past-time.

Since resigning, I’ve taken to Twitter a lot more than usual. I found it to be a very stimulating platform, with a massive feed of new information coming in every single day. And I’ve responded to that, tweeting and engaging on a near-24/7 basis.

Jun 2018: Your Tweets earned 47.5K impressions over this 30 day period
Oct 2018: Your Tweets earned 487.4K impressions over this 27 day period

I love doing this – the debates, the arguments (constrained as they are by the 280-character limit, threading, and like-baiting), and meeting like-minded people this way. Unfortunately I can’t keep doing it at the same pace, though – I have new responsibilities.

In April I quit my job to pursue a new set of opportunities. Over the last 6 months, it’s panned out better than I had expected. I’ve been able to accumulate something of a runway, enabling me to do what I really want to do: Carve out large blocks of time to do in-depth SaaS builds on products I think I can sell.

That requires relentless focus, though. While it was easy to spend hours a day on Twitter in the beginning, it’s becoming a distraction now that I’m fully engaged in work. I don’t want to lose any of the momentum I’ve built, so I’m trying something new.

I enjoy thinking about complex things, then discussing my ideas with people who have interesting things of their own to say. It’s hard to do that on Twitter though, thanks to the sheer firehose of data:

After spending an ~hour with @WotanZA having an actual conversation (diverse as it was), and the next hour sitting on a quiet balcony and just processing everything, I felt like I was in a much better mental state. Then I checked Twitter and it all went to shit.

I currently follow many great accounts, and I get a massive amount of new info every day from all sorts of places: left- and right-wing news media, cryptocurrencies, financial services, gaming, mergers, tech industry news, psychological studies, the list goes on.

It’s an addiction I can’t really afford to feed anymore, though. I’ve consciously observed how I use Twitter over the last month, and I’ve noted several things:

  • Opening the app to check for new content has become routine, and I’ve often found myself in the aimless-fridge loop: Opening the same door over and over again even though there’s nothing new.
  • I typically scan the entire timeline every morning, consuming every single tweet
  • I post knee-jerk reactions to a lot of stuff, and more detailed threads when I’ve had the time to think about it
  • I get into arguments quite a lot, which is hard to fit into the platform’s limitations and doesn’t give me a good place to fully express my argument. Most importantly:
  • Every time I open Twitter, even just for a 10-second check, disrupts minutes worth of productivity.

In effect, I lose hours of daylight productivity (which is when my feed is the most active), and have to make up for it in the evenings. It’s led to a disrupted sleep schedule and failures to make and stick to my plans. I’m also pretty sure it’s contributing to weight gain and hypertension, but the disruptions to the first two mean I have no disciplined regime for monitoring the rest.

So for my own health, discipline and mental well-being, I’m trying something new. I’m going to unfollow every single account on Twitter.

This means that the only things I get from the app are things that people send to me directly and deliberately: @-mentions, tweet replies and DMs, which I will happily respond to. As a messenger app, Twitter would be as manageable as WhatsApp, which takes up very little of my time every day.

I’ll still use Twitter to share stuff, but they’ll either be long-form threads or links to posts like this one. I decided months ago that I need to get into the habit of producing more long-form content anyway (part of another long-term goal), and this is a good way to do it.

This does mean that I’ll be quitting a very strong addiction cold-turkey. FOMO is real, and I think I may have developed a dependency on the constant stimulation, so it’s probably not going to go well at first.

After the jitters though, I hope I can direct my writing energies into something more productive: Longer, more detailed posts made on this blog, shared for discussion on Twitter. I think this is the environment that will let me do my best work, while providing quality content to the people that follow me (which is something I take very seriously).

It should also result in more consistent, “on-brand” stuff. Using Twitter like a personal account means I end up shitposting a lot, and long-term that’s not really adding much value for me. Other than being entertaining, of course.

This blog will get a lot less formal, a lot more conversational, and will probably focus on politics and the culture wars as much as technology. I doubt I’ll ever write detailed technical articles here again, but I’ll leave the full history intact – they’re my best-performing posts right now.

I generally leave comments open on my posts, but if you want to get in touch directly and have a private conversation, my details are on the Contact page. Let’s do this!

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